Caleb Trotter

Studies Law at Loyola New Orleans

Florida v Jardines

In 2012 I wrote a casenote on the 4th amendment, dog sniff case, Florida v. Jardines. Read on below.

FLORIDA V. JARDINES: THE SUPREME COURT CURBS DRUG-SNIFFING DOGS

Caleb R. Trotter

I. INTRODUCTION

 In Florida v. Jardines,[1] the United States Supreme Court addressed the issue of whether law enforcement is permitted to use drug-sniffing dogs to investigate areas on private property surrounding homes for drugs without a search warrant. In a 5-4 decision, the Court limited law enforcement’s ability to search a home via drug-sniffing dogs without a warrant, classifying such a search as a trespass.[2] 

Jardines extended the recent line of Fourth Amendment cases limiting law enforcement[3] by expanding the definition of “unreasonable searches and seizures” and focusing on the original meaning of the Amendment.[4] By continuing this trend, the Court signaled that law enforcement must still...

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